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Bright Memory joins Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S launch line-up, Bright Memory: Infinite in 2021

  • Bright Memory is an intense action-packed FPS from one-man studio FYQD, and released earlier this year.
  • The studio is working on a expansion, improvement, and pseudo-sequel known as Bright Memory: Infinite, which debuts sometime in 2021.
  • The first Bright Memory has now been confirmed as a launch day title for Xbox Series X and S, and will launch November 10, 2020 on those consoles.
  • Bright Memory: Infinite promises to push the boundaries of next-gen consoles when it launches next year.

Bright Memory is an intense, genre-melding first-person-shooter that’s currently available for PC’s on Steam, and has been since earlier this year. It’s an incredible proof-of-concept, but Bright Memory as it is now is rather short, and doesn’t contain a huge amount of content. However, the game is built by one man, known as FYQD-Studio, and they’re working on building onto the concept of Bright Memory with a major expansion, improvements, and much more in the sort-of-but-not-really sequel Bright Memory: Infinite.

While we all wait for baited breath for Bright Memory: Infinite, FYQD-Studio and publisher Playism have announced that the first Bright Memory is joining the growing ranks of Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S launch titles, debuting on consoles on November 10, 2020. This will give players a chance to jump into FYQD’s creation and see what Bright Memory has to offer, which is insane levels of shooter action packed into a relatively modest game. It spells big things for Bright Memory: Infinite, which will be arriving sometime in 2021, and will look amazing on Xbox Series X when it launches.

Source: Playism

Bright Memory: Infinite will massively expand upon the first Bright Memory, which is little more than a demo, and feature improved visuals and even ray tracing support, and frankly looks pretty incredible. It’s even more notable when one realizes that one person is behind this game, making it obvious they have put a ton of work into this passion project.

If you’re interested in Bright Memory: Infinite, you can already wishlist it on Steam, but you’ll have to wait a little longer before pre-ordering or purchasing it on consoles. Hopefully we won’t have to wait long to learn, especially with the Xbox Series X and S only a little ways away, with pre-orders opening throughout today.

Leading 4K

Xbox Series X

The full next-generation experience.

Xbox Series X is Microsoft’s new flagship, as its most powerful console with over 12TF GPU performance and a custom SSD. It boasts up to 4K resolution and 120 FPS, full backward compatibility across four generations, and ray-tracing support.

  • See at Microsoft
  • See at Amazon

Next-gen in HD

Xbox Series S

Experience next-gen gaming for less.

Microsoft serves the next-generation for less with its budget-friendly Xbox Series S. The console packs the same high-performance CPU and SSD technology as Xbox Series X, while scaling back the GPU and removing the disc drive.

  • See at Microsoft
  • See at Amazon

We may earn a commission for purchases using our links. Learn more.

Does the Xbox Series X or Series S support virtual reality (VR)?

The answer is no. Here’s what Xbox head Phil Spencer had to say about it.

These are the best deals on Xbox consoles you’ll find this month

If you’re in the market for a new Xbox One console, you’ll want to check these deals out first.

Review: Corsair made its first licensed Xbox headset and it’s superb

Corsair’s first official licensed Xbox headset is pretty impressive. Here’s why we think it should definitely be on your radar for anyone who wants to upgrade their Xbox One, Series X, or Series S audio.

These are the best keyboards to use with Xbox Series X and S

Xbox Series X and S continue Xbox’s support of mouse and keyboard control, so we rounded up the best keyboards to use with your next-gen console.

  • Bright Memory is an intense action-packed FPS from one-man studio FYQD, and released earlier this year.
  • The studio is working on a expansion, improvement, and pseudo-sequel known as Bright Memory: Infinite, which debuts sometime in 2021.
  • The first Bright Memory has now been confirmed as a launch day title for Xbox Series X and S, and will launch November 10, 2020 on those consoles.
  • Bright Memory: Infinite promises to push the boundaries of next-gen consoles when it launches next year.

Bright Memory is an intense, genre-melding first-person-shooter that’s currently available for PC’s on Steam, and has been since earlier this year. It’s an incredible proof-of-concept, but Bright Memory as it is now is rather short, and doesn’t contain a huge amount of content. However, the game is built by one man, known as FYQD-Studio, and they’re working on building onto the concept of Bright Memory with a major expansion, improvements, and much more in the sort-of-but-not-really sequel Bright Memory: Infinite.

While we all wait for baited breath for Bright Memory: Infinite, FYQD-Studio and publisher Playism have announced that the first Bright Memory is joining the growing ranks of Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S launch titles, debuting on consoles on November 10, 2020. This will give players a chance to jump into FYQD’s creation and see what Bright Memory has to offer, which is insane levels of shooter action packed into a relatively modest game. It spells big things for Bright Memory: Infinite, which will be arriving sometime in 2021, and will look amazing on Xbox Series X when it launches.

Source: Playism

Bright Memory: Infinite will massively expand upon the first Bright Memory, which is little more than a demo, and feature improved visuals and even ray tracing support, and frankly looks pretty incredible. It’s even more notable when one realizes that one person is behind this game, making it obvious they have put a ton of work into this passion project.

If you’re interested in Bright Memory: Infinite, you can already wishlist it on Steam, but you’ll have to wait a little longer before pre-ordering or purchasing it on consoles. Hopefully we won’t have to wait long to learn, especially with the Xbox Series X and S only a little ways away, with pre-orders opening throughout today.

Leading 4K

Xbox Series X

The full next-generation experience.

Xbox Series X is Microsoft’s new flagship, as its most powerful console with over 12TF GPU performance and a custom SSD. It boasts up to 4K resolution and 120 FPS, full backward compatibility across four generations, and ray-tracing support.

  • See at Microsoft
  • See at Amazon

Next-gen in HD

Xbox Series S

Experience next-gen gaming for less.

Microsoft serves the next-generation for less with its budget-friendly Xbox Series S. The console packs the same high-performance CPU and SSD technology as Xbox Series X, while scaling back the GPU and removing the disc drive.

  • See at Microsoft
  • See at Amazon

We may earn a commission for purchases using our links. Learn more.

Does the Xbox Series X or Series S support virtual reality (VR)?

The answer is no. Here’s what Xbox head Phil Spencer had to say about it.

These are the best deals on Xbox consoles you’ll find this month

If you’re in the market for a new Xbox One console, you’ll want to check these deals out first.

Review: Corsair made its first licensed Xbox headset and it’s superb

Corsair’s first official licensed Xbox headset is pretty impressive. Here’s why we think it should definitely be on your radar for anyone who wants to upgrade their Xbox One, Series X, or Series S audio.

These are the best keyboards to use with Xbox Series X and S

Xbox Series X and S continue Xbox’s support of mouse and keyboard control, so we rounded up the best keyboards to use with your next-gen console.

Читать еще:  Anodyne 2: Return to Dust

What is Bright Memory Infinite?

Now that you already know what Bright Memory is let’s talk about Bright Memory Infinite. For lack of better wording, it is the continuation of the original game.

Bright Memory: Infinite was created as a demo to showcase the power of the Nvidia RTX GPUs, and the developer of the game set out to see how much power he could squeeze out of the video cars. By incorporating as many new and existing technologies as possible, the game featured Ray-Traced Reflection, Ray-Traced Shadows, Ray-Traced Global Illumination, and Ray-Traced Ambient Occlusion. It was a graphical tour de force that was only playable on Nvidia RTX hardware, and it showed. Not only was Bright Memory Infinite entered into Nvidia’s XR Spotlight Contest in China, but it was also one of the few titles selected as the winner.

Advertisement

Since then, developer Zeng Xiancheng quit his job to work on Bright Memory Infinite full-time. Promising that Infinite will improve on the original game with larger areas, better combat, and a much bigger game. Bright Memory Infinite is also being developed on a new codebase, leaving Bright Memory as a demo for the more ambitious title.

However, as a goodwill gesture, anyone who purchased Bright Memory will get access to Bright Memory Infinite when it is released for free.

As for when Bright Memory Infinite will be released, that’s anyone’s guess. I’d hope that Zeng Xiancheng isn’t under a stress-inducing release date and can focus all this attention on making the game as good as it can be. It will be available for the PS4, PS4, Xbox One, Xbox Series X, and PC, with Playism handling the publishing duties whenever it does get released. Until then, check out Bright Memory on Steam and start practicing those insane combos.

About The Author

Keith Mitchell is the Founder and Editor in Chief of The Outerhaven. A grizzled IT professional during the day, but a passionate lover of video games after his 9-5 grind. Loves playing the Dark Souls series and has been gaming since he was 6 years old. Yes, I am a black gaming journalist.

Bright Memory suffers from numerous technical issues and completely fails to take advantage of the Xbox Series X console’s capabilities.

Microsoft recently launched its next-generation Xbox Series X console alongside a slew of games for players to try on the new system. One game launching with Microsoft’s new console is the sci-fi first-person shooter Bright Memory, and while its budget price may make it enticing to some, it’s best if most Xbox Series X early adopters skip it entirely.

Bright Memory is available for a mere $8, which is much cheaper than most of the other games that launched with the Xbox Series X. However, it won’t take long for Xbox Series X players to figure out why Bright Memory is sold at such a low price point. Not only is Bright Memory incredibly short, with players able to unlock all of the achievements in literally 1-2 hours time, but it’s also marred by severe technical issues.

Bright Memory suffers from serious screen-tearing issues when playing on the Xbox Series X, with a chugging frame rate to go along with it. Despite the game supposedly being optimized for Xbox Series X, it performs worse than any other Series X launch title we tested, and is not a great way of showing off the console’s capabilities at all. There’s nothing about Bright Memory‘s performance that makes it feel like a next-gen game in the slightest.

Bright Memory lags behind other Xbox Series X launch titles in terms of its visuals as well. There are brief moments when Bright Memory‘s environments look impressive, but otherwise the game is bland, with poorly-animated character models, clipping issues, and all other kinds of visual defects.

Bright Memory‘s characters in general are a low point, largely thanks to its nonsensical story and poor voice acting performances. Players take on the role of a generic sci-fi soldier character named Shelia who has to kill a slew of monsters while coming into conflict with armed human antagonists. Even after completing the game, it’s unclear exactly what was going on, and the abrupt ending will leave players as clueless as they were when they first started.

Bright Memory‘s voice acting is yet another one of the game’s glaring flaws, with Shelia’s actor putting unnecessary inflection on sentences like she’s always asking a question. The other performances aren’t any better, though to be fair, the dialogue that they had to work with is B-movie quality stuff. It’s cheesy and weird, and not in a fun, «so bad it’s good» kind of way. Beyond the voice acting, Bright Memory players will also notice that the audio design in general is lacking, with the music in the main menu sometimes sounding like it’s cutting out.

All of these flaws could be forgiven, to an extent, if Bright Memory had compelling gameplay. Unfortunately, Bright Memory is about as basic as it comes, and its attempt to marry first-person shooter gameplay with Devil May Cry-style melee action doesn’t quite hit the mark. Unresponsive controls can sometimes make Bright Memory‘s combat a nightmare, and trying to combine the melee combat with the shooting is disorienting. There’s a reason why games like Devil May Cry are third-person.

Leaning in to the Devil May Cry inspiration, Bright Memory ranks players based on their performance in any given combat encounter with letter rankings. On paper, this seems like it would actually go a long way in making every fight more meaningful and exciting, as players are rewarded for killing enemies in stylish ways, utilizing all of the tools at their disposal. And for the most part, it succeeds at that. The issue is that the rankings like to randomly disappear from the screen, then reappear moments later when players are doing something completely different, like walking down a hallway. Like the visuals, Bright Memory‘s combat system is undermined by bugs and technical shortcomings.

However, as players collect XP and earn upgrades in Bright Memory, the combat gradually becomes more fun. Bright Memory‘s New Game+ playthroughs are where things finally click, as players will have access to a wider arsenal of abilities. If they’re quick enough (and the controls cooperate), fully-leveled Bright Memory players can string together impressive combos, allowing them to juggle enemies in the air for long periods of time.

Now the caveat to all of this criticism is that Bright Memory comes from a one-man development team. When one takes this into account, Bright Memory is much more impressive. However, this doesn’t change the game’s quality, and in its current state, it’s impossible to recommend to any Xbox Series X early adopters. The upcoming Bright Memory: Infinite looks much better, both in terms of graphics and gameplay, and maybe it will defy expectations.

While Bright Memory: Infinite may end up being a more well-rounded gameplay experience, Bright Memory in its current state is arguably the worst title in the Xbox Series X launch lineup and even though it’s available at a budget price and only lasts a couple of hours, it’s still difficult to recommend to anyone.

Bright Memory is out now for Android, iOS, PC, and Xbox Series X. Game Rant reviewed the game on Xbox Series X.

Our Rating:

Dalton Cooper is an editor for Game Rant who has been writing about video games professionally since 2011. Having written thousands of game reviews and articles over the course of his career, Dalton considers himself a video game historian and strives to play as many games as possible. Dalton covers the latest breaking news for Game Rant, as well as writes reviews, guide content, and more.

Bright Memory suffers from numerous technical issues and completely fails to take advantage of the Xbox Series X console’s capabilities.

Microsoft recently launched its next-generation Xbox Series X console alongside a slew of games for players to try on the new system. One game launching with Microsoft’s new console is the sci-fi first-person shooter Bright Memory, and while its budget price may make it enticing to some, it’s best if most Xbox Series X early adopters skip it entirely.

Bright Memory is available for a mere $8, which is much cheaper than most of the other games that launched with the Xbox Series X. However, it won’t take long for Xbox Series X players to figure out why Bright Memory is sold at such a low price point. Not only is Bright Memory incredibly short, with players able to unlock all of the achievements in literally 1-2 hours time, but it’s also marred by severe technical issues.

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Bright Memory suffers from serious screen-tearing issues when playing on the Xbox Series X, with a chugging frame rate to go along with it. Despite the game supposedly being optimized for Xbox Series X, it performs worse than any other Series X launch title we tested, and is not a great way of showing off the console’s capabilities at all. There’s nothing about Bright Memory‘s performance that makes it feel like a next-gen game in the slightest.

Bright Memory lags behind other Xbox Series X launch titles in terms of its visuals as well. There are brief moments when Bright Memory‘s environments look impressive, but otherwise the game is bland, with poorly-animated character models, clipping issues, and all other kinds of visual defects.

Bright Memory‘s characters in general are a low point, largely thanks to its nonsensical story and poor voice acting performances. Players take on the role of a generic sci-fi soldier character named Shelia who has to kill a slew of monsters while coming into conflict with armed human antagonists. Even after completing the game, it’s unclear exactly what was going on, and the abrupt ending will leave players as clueless as they were when they first started.

Bright Memory‘s voice acting is yet another one of the game’s glaring flaws, with Shelia’s actor putting unnecessary inflection on sentences like she’s always asking a question. The other performances aren’t any better, though to be fair, the dialogue that they had to work with is B-movie quality stuff. It’s cheesy and weird, and not in a fun, «so bad it’s good» kind of way. Beyond the voice acting, Bright Memory players will also notice that the audio design in general is lacking, with the music in the main menu sometimes sounding like it’s cutting out.

All of these flaws could be forgiven, to an extent, if Bright Memory had compelling gameplay. Unfortunately, Bright Memory is about as basic as it comes, and its attempt to marry first-person shooter gameplay with Devil May Cry-style melee action doesn’t quite hit the mark. Unresponsive controls can sometimes make Bright Memory‘s combat a nightmare, and trying to combine the melee combat with the shooting is disorienting. There’s a reason why games like Devil May Cry are third-person.

Leaning in to the Devil May Cry inspiration, Bright Memory ranks players based on their performance in any given combat encounter with letter rankings. On paper, this seems like it would actually go a long way in making every fight more meaningful and exciting, as players are rewarded for killing enemies in stylish ways, utilizing all of the tools at their disposal. And for the most part, it succeeds at that. The issue is that the rankings like to randomly disappear from the screen, then reappear moments later when players are doing something completely different, like walking down a hallway. Like the visuals, Bright Memory‘s combat system is undermined by bugs and technical shortcomings.

However, as players collect XP and earn upgrades in Bright Memory, the combat gradually becomes more fun. Bright Memory‘s New Game+ playthroughs are where things finally click, as players will have access to a wider arsenal of abilities. If they’re quick enough (and the controls cooperate), fully-leveled Bright Memory players can string together impressive combos, allowing them to juggle enemies in the air for long periods of time.

Now the caveat to all of this criticism is that Bright Memory comes from a one-man development team. When one takes this into account, Bright Memory is much more impressive. However, this doesn’t change the game’s quality, and in its current state, it’s impossible to recommend to any Xbox Series X early adopters. The upcoming Bright Memory: Infinite looks much better, both in terms of graphics and gameplay, and maybe it will defy expectations.

While Bright Memory: Infinite may end up being a more well-rounded gameplay experience, Bright Memory in its current state is arguably the worst title in the Xbox Series X launch lineup and even though it’s available at a budget price and only lasts a couple of hours, it’s still difficult to recommend to anyone.

Bright Memory is out now for Android, iOS, PC, and Xbox Series X. Game Rant reviewed the game on Xbox Series X.

Our Rating:

Dalton Cooper is an editor for Game Rant who has been writing about video games professionally since 2011. Having written thousands of game reviews and articles over the course of his career, Dalton considers himself a video game historian and strives to play as many games as possible. Dalton covers the latest breaking news for Game Rant, as well as writes reviews, guide content, and more.

  • Bright Memory is an intense action-packed FPS from one-man studio FYQD, and released earlier this year.
  • The studio is working on a expansion, improvement, and pseudo-sequel known as Bright Memory: Infinite, which debuts sometime in 2021.
  • The first Bright Memory has now been confirmed as a launch day title for Xbox Series X and S, and will launch November 10, 2020 on those consoles.
  • Bright Memory: Infinite promises to push the boundaries of next-gen consoles when it launches next year.

Bright Memory is an intense, genre-melding first-person-shooter that’s currently available for PC’s on Steam, and has been since earlier this year. It’s an incredible proof-of-concept, but Bright Memory as it is now is rather short, and doesn’t contain a huge amount of content. However, the game is built by one man, known as FYQD-Studio, and they’re working on building onto the concept of Bright Memory with a major expansion, improvements, and much more in the sort-of-but-not-really sequel Bright Memory: Infinite.

While we all wait for baited breath for Bright Memory: Infinite, FYQD-Studio and publisher Playism have announced that the first Bright Memory is joining the growing ranks of Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S launch titles, debuting on consoles on November 10, 2020. This will give players a chance to jump into FYQD’s creation and see what Bright Memory has to offer, which is insane levels of shooter action packed into a relatively modest game. It spells big things for Bright Memory: Infinite, which will be arriving sometime in 2021, and will look amazing on Xbox Series X when it launches.

Source: Playism

Bright Memory: Infinite will massively expand upon the first Bright Memory, which is little more than a demo, and feature improved visuals and even ray tracing support, and frankly looks pretty incredible. It’s even more notable when one realizes that one person is behind this game, making it obvious they have put a ton of work into this passion project.

If you’re interested in Bright Memory: Infinite, you can already wishlist it on Steam, but you’ll have to wait a little longer before pre-ordering or purchasing it on consoles. Hopefully we won’t have to wait long to learn, especially with the Xbox Series X and S only a little ways away, with pre-orders opening throughout today.

Leading 4K

Xbox Series X

The full next-generation experience.

Xbox Series X is Microsoft’s new flagship, as its most powerful console with over 12TF GPU performance and a custom SSD. It boasts up to 4K resolution and 120 FPS, full backward compatibility across four generations, and ray-tracing support.

  • See at Microsoft
  • See at Amazon

Next-gen in HD

Xbox Series S

Experience next-gen gaming for less.

Microsoft serves the next-generation for less with its budget-friendly Xbox Series S. The console packs the same high-performance CPU and SSD technology as Xbox Series X, while scaling back the GPU and removing the disc drive.

  • See at Microsoft
  • See at Amazon

We may earn a commission for purchases using our links. Learn more.

Does the Xbox Series X or Series S support virtual reality (VR)?

The answer is no. Here’s what Xbox head Phil Spencer had to say about it.

These are the best deals on Xbox consoles you’ll find this month

If you’re in the market for a new Xbox One console, you’ll want to check these deals out first.

Review: Corsair made its first licensed Xbox headset and it’s superb

Corsair’s first official licensed Xbox headset is pretty impressive. Here’s why we think it should definitely be on your radar for anyone who wants to upgrade their Xbox One, Series X, or Series S audio.

These are the best keyboards to use with Xbox Series X and S

Xbox Series X and S continue Xbox’s support of mouse and keyboard control, so we rounded up the best keyboards to use with your next-gen console.

First, there was Bright Memory.

In May 2020, Chinese independent developer FYQD Personal Studio released Bright Memory onto Steam and introduced the world to one of the more unique action titles in a long while. Developed by one person in his spare time as he worked a conventional job, this title was created in an episodic game model. Bright Memory went into early access during 2019, and Bright Memory 1.0 went retail on March 25th, 2020.

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Not only was it a title developed by a single person, but it also was one of the wildest action first-person perspective titles, with the usage of swords, guns, other unique skills, and combos. It felt like a Devil May Cry game played from a first-person perspective, similar to the Wii game, Red Steel – but on steroids. It was also developed on Unreal Engine 4.

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Then during the May 2020 Xbox Series X reveal, a new game called ” Bright Memory Infinite” was shown, and suddenly I started asking what the difference was between this new game and the original. It looked the same, it played the same, and thus I was trying to understand where the difference was. Until just the other day, I never received an answer that Bright Memory Infinite was shown off again during the Future Game Show.

Bright Memory suffers from numerous technical issues and completely fails to take advantage of the Xbox Series X console’s capabilities.

Microsoft recently launched its next-generation Xbox Series X console alongside a slew of games for players to try on the new system. One game launching with Microsoft’s new console is the sci-fi first-person shooter Bright Memory, and while its budget price may make it enticing to some, it’s best if most Xbox Series X early adopters skip it entirely.

Bright Memory is available for a mere $8, which is much cheaper than most of the other games that launched with the Xbox Series X. However, it won’t take long for Xbox Series X players to figure out why Bright Memory is sold at such a low price point. Not only is Bright Memory incredibly short, with players able to unlock all of the achievements in literally 1-2 hours time, but it’s also marred by severe technical issues.

Bright Memory suffers from serious screen-tearing issues when playing on the Xbox Series X, with a chugging frame rate to go along with it. Despite the game supposedly being optimized for Xbox Series X, it performs worse than any other Series X launch title we tested, and is not a great way of showing off the console’s capabilities at all. There’s nothing about Bright Memory‘s performance that makes it feel like a next-gen game in the slightest.

Bright Memory lags behind other Xbox Series X launch titles in terms of its visuals as well. There are brief moments when Bright Memory‘s environments look impressive, but otherwise the game is bland, with poorly-animated character models, clipping issues, and all other kinds of visual defects.

Bright Memory‘s characters in general are a low point, largely thanks to its nonsensical story and poor voice acting performances. Players take on the role of a generic sci-fi soldier character named Shelia who has to kill a slew of monsters while coming into conflict with armed human antagonists. Even after completing the game, it’s unclear exactly what was going on, and the abrupt ending will leave players as clueless as they were when they first started.

Bright Memory‘s voice acting is yet another one of the game’s glaring flaws, with Shelia’s actor putting unnecessary inflection on sentences like she’s always asking a question. The other performances aren’t any better, though to be fair, the dialogue that they had to work with is B-movie quality stuff. It’s cheesy and weird, and not in a fun, «so bad it’s good» kind of way. Beyond the voice acting, Bright Memory players will also notice that the audio design in general is lacking, with the music in the main menu sometimes sounding like it’s cutting out.

All of these flaws could be forgiven, to an extent, if Bright Memory had compelling gameplay. Unfortunately, Bright Memory is about as basic as it comes, and its attempt to marry first-person shooter gameplay with Devil May Cry-style melee action doesn’t quite hit the mark. Unresponsive controls can sometimes make Bright Memory‘s combat a nightmare, and trying to combine the melee combat with the shooting is disorienting. There’s a reason why games like Devil May Cry are third-person.

Leaning in to the Devil May Cry inspiration, Bright Memory ranks players based on their performance in any given combat encounter with letter rankings. On paper, this seems like it would actually go a long way in making every fight more meaningful and exciting, as players are rewarded for killing enemies in stylish ways, utilizing all of the tools at their disposal. And for the most part, it succeeds at that. The issue is that the rankings like to randomly disappear from the screen, then reappear moments later when players are doing something completely different, like walking down a hallway. Like the visuals, Bright Memory‘s combat system is undermined by bugs and technical shortcomings.

However, as players collect XP and earn upgrades in Bright Memory, the combat gradually becomes more fun. Bright Memory‘s New Game+ playthroughs are where things finally click, as players will have access to a wider arsenal of abilities. If they’re quick enough (and the controls cooperate), fully-leveled Bright Memory players can string together impressive combos, allowing them to juggle enemies in the air for long periods of time.

Now the caveat to all of this criticism is that Bright Memory comes from a one-man development team. When one takes this into account, Bright Memory is much more impressive. However, this doesn’t change the game’s quality, and in its current state, it’s impossible to recommend to any Xbox Series X early adopters. The upcoming Bright Memory: Infinite looks much better, both in terms of graphics and gameplay, and maybe it will defy expectations.

While Bright Memory: Infinite may end up being a more well-rounded gameplay experience, Bright Memory in its current state is arguably the worst title in the Xbox Series X launch lineup and even though it’s available at a budget price and only lasts a couple of hours, it’s still difficult to recommend to anyone.

Bright Memory is out now for Android, iOS, PC, and Xbox Series X. Game Rant reviewed the game on Xbox Series X.

Our Rating:

Dalton Cooper is an editor for Game Rant who has been writing about video games professionally since 2011. Having written thousands of game reviews and articles over the course of his career, Dalton considers himself a video game historian and strives to play as many games as possible. Dalton covers the latest breaking news for Game Rant, as well as writes reviews, guide content, and more.

What is Bright Memory Infinite?

Now that you already know what Bright Memory is let’s talk about Bright Memory Infinite. For lack of better wording, it is the continuation of the original game.

Bright Memory: Infinite was created as a demo to showcase the power of the Nvidia RTX GPUs, and the developer of the game set out to see how much power he could squeeze out of the video cars. By incorporating as many new and existing technologies as possible, the game featured Ray-Traced Reflection, Ray-Traced Shadows, Ray-Traced Global Illumination, and Ray-Traced Ambient Occlusion. It was a graphical tour de force that was only playable on Nvidia RTX hardware, and it showed. Not only was Bright Memory Infinite entered into Nvidia’s XR Spotlight Contest in China, but it was also one of the few titles selected as the winner.

Advertisement

Since then, developer Zeng Xiancheng quit his job to work on Bright Memory Infinite full-time. Promising that Infinite will improve on the original game with larger areas, better combat, and a much bigger game. Bright Memory Infinite is also being developed on a new codebase, leaving Bright Memory as a demo for the more ambitious title.

However, as a goodwill gesture, anyone who purchased Bright Memory will get access to Bright Memory Infinite when it is released for free.

As for when Bright Memory Infinite will be released, that’s anyone’s guess. I’d hope that Zeng Xiancheng isn’t under a stress-inducing release date and can focus all this attention on making the game as good as it can be. It will be available for the PS4, PS4, Xbox One, Xbox Series X, and PC, with Playism handling the publishing duties whenever it does get released. Until then, check out Bright Memory on Steam and start practicing those insane combos.

About The Author

Keith Mitchell is the Founder and Editor in Chief of The Outerhaven. A grizzled IT professional during the day, but a passionate lover of video games after his 9-5 grind. Loves playing the Dark Souls series and has been gaming since he was 6 years old. Yes, I am a black gaming journalist.

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