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Need for BurnOut Mania

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1. Know when burnout is coming.

This is slightly more difficult than it sounds. You’d think spotting oncoming exhaustion wouldn’t be hard, but the signs of burnout are sometimes more subtle than you’d expect and entrepreneurs are often too hopped up and wired to see where things are headed until it’s too late. To head burnout off at the pass, you need to learn the early warning signs of its approach.

«I found this article from LifeHacker to be pretty helpful to judge if you are having a burnout,» Nguyen suggests, adding that sometimes when you’re unsure about your energy levels, the best course of action is to ask others to give you a frank evaluation of your mental state. «In extreme cases I came across, the person was so consumed by stress that he was not able to tell that he is burnt,» he writes.

Out of Sight, But Not Out of Mind: High-Functioning Bipolar Disorder

It is quite common for people living with high-functioning bipolar disorder not to realise that what they’re dealing with is a mental health condition. What you are likely aware of is the turbulent emotions that churn just under the surface – and most likely, you’re exhausted trying to manage them. Talking to a professional about what you are feeling internally is a critical step in figuring out if you are struggling with high-functioning bipolar disorder, and ultimately getting relief from your symptoms.

The term “high-functioning,” when applied to bipolar disorder, does not apply to the severity of the condition, but rather the person’s ability to manage it. This means that the person may be experiencing acute symptoms, but is able to mask them and maintain daily functions. While you might think that as long as you are able to cope with the symptoms that you don’t require professional support, this is far from the truth. The stress and sheer energy it takes to try to get by completely on your own can push you to the brink – and beyond – what is good for your health.

The Dangers of High-Functioning Bipolar Disorder

While maintaining high function can have professional and social benefits, it can also come with significant dangers. Just as functionality can be used to keep the existence or severity of your bipolar disorder from others, it may also keep it hidden from yourself. You may take your ability to work, to socialize, to participate in everyday life as a sign that you don’t need treatment or that treatment is working, even when your symptoms are just being pushed under the rug rather than actually improving; temporarily staving off functional disruption isn’t the same as healing, and working so hard to maintain function in one area can leave you without resources to devote to other vital parts of your life. At other times, what is interpreted as high functionality may, in fact, be symptoms of the illness; the increased energy, sense of possibility, happiness, and flourish of ideas that seemingly enhance your professional and personal life could be signs of mania or hypomania. Left unabated, these episodes may not only be destructive in and of themselves, they may also instigate mood switching and contribute to long-term changes in the brain.

Hiding your bipolar disorder by masking its symptoms also has another disturbing effect; it can keep you from developing a strong social support network in which you can freely express your thoughts, feelings, and experiences. Research proves again and again that people who have high-quality close relationships have better outcomes and fewer recurrences than those who do not. While there are certainly very real risks associated with disclosing bipolar disorder—particularly in professional environments—keeping yourself isolated within your illness is also a dangerous endeavor. Being able to be open about your illness, give voice to your distress, and feel heard and validated by people who care about your is imperative to the healing process.

Call for a Free Confidential Assessment.

7 in 10 Bipolar Cases are Misdiagnosed

Proper Diagnosis is Essential for Effective Treatment

Soon after Missy had her daughter, she stopped sleeping, going from eight hours a night down to only two or three. Her thoughts were racing, and she was going a million miles an hour. After a few nights, Missy’s husband Bill finally took her to the hospital. He couldn’t believe that one minute his wonderful wife seemed just fine and now she had become a patient in a psych unit.

From the time Ally was nine months old, her parents Bill and Nancy knew that something was wrong. Ally couldn’t sleep, had temper tantrums up to 20 times a day, and increasingly became more aggressive. Medical professionals told Bill and Nancy not to worry, that she’ll grown out of it, but they continued to seek help from doctor after doctor.

Nell’s sister, Maud, stopped taking her medication for bipolar disorder and fell into a depressive episode. Nell threw all her energies into visiting her sister at the hospital, comforting and supporting her while the doctors tried drug after drug before finding the right ones; explaining to Maud’s boss why she would be out of the office for weeks or more; and wondering how to cope with the new financial and emotional burdens in her life.

Missy, Ally, and Maud all have bipolar disorder (also known as manic depression), in which moods gyrate between the highs of mania and the lows of depression. They have been hospitalized, have struggled to come to terms with their diagnosis, and have suffered deeply. All three have family caregivers — a spouse, parents, a sibling – who are dedicated to helping them recover, but who feel uninformed, isolated, overwhelmed, sad, and at times, angry and hopeless.

Caring for someone with any illness is difficult. Caring for someone with a psychiatric illness is especially hard for many reasons. Health care coverage is far more limited than for other illnesses. Just getting someone who is in a state of mania — even when psychotic — hospitalized and accurately diagnosed is a major accomplishment. People living with bipolar disease, particularly when they are in an up (manic) rather than down (depressed) phase, often refuse to see a clinician and stop taking their medication. The medications are powerful and have unpleasant side effects.

There is no cure for bipolar disorder and so the drugs must be taken for life, a daunting prospect, especially for younger sufferers. Finding the right meds may take as long as several years, and over time they may stop working. For family caregivers, coping with someone who is manic or depressed takes a heavy emotional toll and strains the relationship, often to the breaking point. An added burden is the stigma of mental illness, which leaves families feeling frightened and isolated, unaware that many other families share their experience.

Given all these challenges, caring for someone with bipolar disorder can be overwhelming and at times an impossible responsibility to maintain. But there are ways to cope effectively. Families for Depression Awareness, the nonprofit organization I founded (after losing my brother and helping my father get diagnosed with depression,) has interviewed many families that are doing well. True, it took a while to learn how best to help and support their bipolar family member, and time, too, to learn that caregivers also have needs that must be met. Sometimes the stresses and strains were intense, and these families have had their ups and downs. But by educating themselves about bipolar disorder, improving treatment by finding the best possible medication and therapy solutions possible, and communicating as a tightly knit unit, these families have met the challenges, survived intact, and are emotionally healthy.

Here are ways that you can help someone with bipolar disorder:

  • Become educated. The first step is to become educated about bipolar disorder, so you have realistic expectations and coping options.
  • Make this is a family matter. Acknowledge that one member’s depressive disorder affects the entire family. Everyone in your immediate family needs to learn about bipolar disorder, its symptoms and early warning signs, how it is treated, and what the side effects of medications may be. And to whatever degree possible, each member should participate in the caregiving process. Being a caregiver is stressful, and it is important that family members discuss their feelings and opinions. Sometimes it helps if a skilled family therapist facilitates these discussions in group sessions.
  • Be a partner in treatment. Find the right treatment for each individual bipolar sufferer usually means going through a process of trial and error with multiple different medications. Patients also need talk therapy to heal. Finding qualified clinicians (e.g., psychopharmacologist, psychiatrist, psychologist) is essential. As a family caregiver, you can help by finding the best clinicians in your area, scheduling appointments, keeping track of medications and making sure they are taken as prescribed, and being an early warning systems by reporting changes to the clinicians.
  • Meet with the patient’s clinician. Make sure to meet with the clinician treating your family member from time to time. Try to go with your family member and if needed, set up some appointments on your own. Although clinicians have to maintain patient confidentiality, they can listen to you and you can report issues you are having caring for your family member.
  • Be understanding. Let your family member with bipolar disorder continually know that you care. People with bipolar disorder have negative thoughts and are hopeless in a depressive state. They need to be reminded that you and others are concerned about them and that you are working together to help them get well.
  • Take care of yourself. Set healthy boundaries on how much you do so you don’t burn out. Take a vacation from caregiving from time to time. Many caregivers develop depression, so don’t be afraid to seek medical help for yourself. You also may need help processing and dealing with your emotions.
  • Find social support. Dealing with bipolar disorder can be lonely and isolating. You’ve watched the healthy person you once knew deteriorate and suffer. Your friends don’t understand bipolar disorder, and it is difficult for you to go out. Make sure you find sources of support such as a bipolar support group in your area.
  • Develop a crisis plan. Talk to your family member with bipolar disorder about what you will do if the person becomes manic or suicidal. For example, some people with bipolar disorder and their families decide that it is best for the person with bipolar disorder not to use credit cards. Also, determine what you will do if you need to hospitalize the person. Put your plan in writing.
  • Have hope. Remember that in most cases, bipolar disorder is treatable and can be stabilized. The condition is usually cyclical, so be prepared for it to worsen and/or improve at times. Finding the right treatment can be a drawn out process, but in time, a solution will be found.

Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder is depression alternating with mania (elated or irritable moods and increased energy).

Depression

  • For at least two weeks, five or more of these symptoms:
  • Feeling miserable and sad almost everyday
  • Losing interest or pleasure in most activities
  • Feeling anxious or irritable
  • Having trouble concentrating or remembering
  • Feeling tired
  • Feeling guilty
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Eating too much or too little
  • Have medically unexplained aches and pains
  • Abusing alcohol or drugs
  • Thinking of death or suicide

Mania

  • At least three of these symptoms:
  • Increased energy and decreased need for sleep.
  • Excessive irritability, euphoria, or aggressive behavior.
  • Increased talkativeness or pressured speech.
  • Disconnected and racing thoughts.
  • Impulsive behavior and poor judgment such as spending sprees, erratic driving, or sexual indiscretions.
  • Inflated self-esteem
  • Increased goal-directed activities
  • Distractibility

Signs of Suicide

If someone has been preoccupied with thoughts of death or suicide, call his or her clinician today. If you think the person may be harmful to you or others, call 911 or take the person to your local emergency room.

  • Other warning signs include:
  • Talking about hopelessness and worthlessness
  • Suddenly being happier and calmer during a depressive episode
  • Making unusual visits or calling people one cares about
  • Making arrangements or getting one’s affairs in order
  • Giving things away

If Someone is Manic

During mania, a person may become paranoid, believe ideas that aren’t based in reality, spend a lot of money, or engage in unsafe activities. Remember that these behaviors are part of a manic state and the person is not in a normal state of mind. Try to prevent the person from carrying out these actions by talking to them and calling the clinician. You also need to keep the person and your family safe. Sometimes people in a manic state must be hospitalized. Make sure you discuss the behavior and options with your clinician, if possible before a crisis occurs so you can take appropriate action.

Comments (2)

It’s me.

I’m bipolar and caring for my sister with MDD. I would advise in cases where manic episode can cause dangerous behavior like spending all their money, you might want to get a financial power of attorney so you can, if needed, turn off their ATM card for their protection. I know that sometimes it’s impossible to do the right thing, so as caregiver you have to be ready, this needs to be accomplished when we are calm and rational. We have to trust you.

Myra Symons 33 days ago

Mental health and care

Thank you for the information on caring for someone with mental illness. I never thought I would be caring for my daughter who’s 28yrs old full time. The articles are very helpful. My daughter was recently diagnosed with Schizoaffective disorder. She is in to her 6month of treatment. without having any knowledge on mental illness my entire life has changed. Self educating, family and support groups have impatcted my well-being so I can continue caring for my daughter. Thank you once again.

What are hypomania and mania?

Hypomania and mania are periods of over-active and excited behaviour that can have a significant impact on your day-to-day life.

  • Hypomania is a milder version of mania that lasts for a short period (usually a few days)
  • Mania is a more severe form that lasts for a longer period (a week or more)

You might have hypomania and/or mania on their own or as part of some mental health problems – including bipolar disorder, seasonal affective disorder, postpartum psychosis or schizoaffective disorder.

Some people find hypomania and mania enjoyable. Or you might find them very uncomfortable, distressing or unpleasant.

«I love being hypomanic because I feel as though I’m on top of the world and can and will do anything I want, but I hate it because I feel so disconnected from everyone else.»

Hypomania

Hypomania lasts for a few days, and can feel more manageable than mania. It can still have a disruptive effect on your life and people may notice a change in your mood and behaviour. But you will usually be able to continue with your daily activities without these being too badly affected.

Symptoms of hypomania can include:

How you might feel

  • happy, euphoric or a sense of wellbeing
  • very excited, like you can’t get your words out fast enough
  • irritable and agitated
  • increased sexual energy
  • easily distracted, like your thoughts are racing, or you can’t concentrate.

How you might behave

Your behaviour may include:

  • being more active than usual
  • talking a lot or speaking very quickly
  • being very friendly
  • sleeping very little
  • spending money excessively
  • losing social inhibitions or taking risks.

«Everything is extremely bright and loud and everything inside my head is moving extremely fast. I’m irritated with everyone because no-one talks or does things as fast as I do. It’s amazing but horrible at the same time. it’s like I’m in my own amazing colourful world but everyone else is still stuck in the normal dull grey one.»

Mania

Mania lasts for a week or more and has a severe negative impact on your ability to do your usual day-to-day activities – often disrupting or stopping these completely. Severe mania is very serious, and often needs to be treated in hospital.

Symptoms of mania can include any of the symptoms of hypomania listed above, and can also include:

How you might feel

  • happy, euphoric or a sense of wellbeing
  • uncontrollably excited, like you can’t get your words out fast enough
  • irritable and agitated
  • increased sexual energy
  • easily distracted, like your thoughts are racing, or you can’t concentrate
  • very confident or adventurous
  • like you are untouchable or can’t be harmed
  • like you can perform physical and mental tasks better than normal
  • like you understand, see or hear things that other people can’t.

How you might behave

Your behaviour may include:

  • being more active than usual
  • talking a lot, speaking very quickly, or not making sense to other people
  • being very friendly
  • saying or doing things that are inappropriate and out of character
  • sleeping very little or not at all
  • being rude or aggressive
  • misusing drugs or alcohol
  • spending money excessively or in a way that is unusual for you
  • losing social inhibitions
  • taking serious risks with your safety.

«My speech started getting really fast. I became aggressive and thought that I could solve the world’s problems by myself. I didn’t sleep, hardly ate or drank and had so much energy that I would pace around the room.»

1. Know when burnout is coming.

This is slightly more difficult than it sounds. You’d think spotting oncoming exhaustion wouldn’t be hard, but the signs of burnout are sometimes more subtle than you’d expect and entrepreneurs are often too hopped up and wired to see where things are headed until it’s too late. To head burnout off at the pass, you need to learn the early warning signs of its approach.

«I found this article from LifeHacker to be pretty helpful to judge if you are having a burnout,» Nguyen suggests, adding that sometimes when you’re unsure about your energy levels, the best course of action is to ask others to give you a frank evaluation of your mental state. «In extreme cases I came across, the person was so consumed by stress that he was not able to tell that he is burnt,» he writes.

Symptoms of High-Functioning Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder can manifest a range of symptoms, some of which can also occur normally in reaction to certain situations or events. However, for people living with bipolar disorder, symptoms occur cyclically, and can happen without significant emotional triggers.

Symptoms of a Manic Episode

  • Increased activity or hyperactivity, including engagement in risky or reckless activities
  • Decreased need for or inability to sleep
  • Rapid speech
  • Racing thoughts
  • Irritability, aggression, or euphoria
  • Elevated heart rate

Symptoms of a Depressive Episode

  • Lack of energy; exhaustion
  • Feelings of guilt or worthlessness
  • Sadness and anxiety
  • Loss of interest and focus
  • Suicidal thoughts

If you recognise some of these symptoms as present in your own life, it’s time to talk to a professional about the possibility of having a high-functioning bipolar disorder.

Soon after Missy had her daughter, she stopped sleeping, going from eight hours a night down to only two or three. Her thoughts were racing, and she was going a million miles an hour. After a few nights, Missy’s husband Bill finally took her to the hospital. He couldn’t believe that one minute his wonderful wife seemed just fine and now she had become a patient in a psych unit.

From the time Ally was nine months old, her parents Bill and Nancy knew that something was wrong. Ally couldn’t sleep, had temper tantrums up to 20 times a day, and increasingly became more aggressive. Medical professionals told Bill and Nancy not to worry, that she’ll grown out of it, but they continued to seek help from doctor after doctor.

Nell’s sister, Maud, stopped taking her medication for bipolar disorder and fell into a depressive episode. Nell threw all her energies into visiting her sister at the hospital, comforting and supporting her while the doctors tried drug after drug before finding the right ones; explaining to Maud’s boss why she would be out of the office for weeks or more; and wondering how to cope with the new financial and emotional burdens in her life.

Missy, Ally, and Maud all have bipolar disorder (also known as manic depression), in which moods gyrate between the highs of mania and the lows of depression. They have been hospitalized, have struggled to come to terms with their diagnosis, and have suffered deeply. All three have family caregivers — a spouse, parents, a sibling – who are dedicated to helping them recover, but who feel uninformed, isolated, overwhelmed, sad, and at times, angry and hopeless.

Caring for someone with any illness is difficult. Caring for someone with a psychiatric illness is especially hard for many reasons. Health care coverage is far more limited than for other illnesses. Just getting someone who is in a state of mania — even when psychotic — hospitalized and accurately diagnosed is a major accomplishment. People living with bipolar disease, particularly when they are in an up (manic) rather than down (depressed) phase, often refuse to see a clinician and stop taking their medication. The medications are powerful and have unpleasant side effects.

There is no cure for bipolar disorder and so the drugs must be taken for life, a daunting prospect, especially for younger sufferers. Finding the right meds may take as long as several years, and over time they may stop working. For family caregivers, coping with someone who is manic or depressed takes a heavy emotional toll and strains the relationship, often to the breaking point. An added burden is the stigma of mental illness, which leaves families feeling frightened and isolated, unaware that many other families share their experience.

Given all these challenges, caring for someone with bipolar disorder can be overwhelming and at times an impossible responsibility to maintain. But there are ways to cope effectively. Families for Depression Awareness, the nonprofit organization I founded (after losing my brother and helping my father get diagnosed with depression,) has interviewed many families that are doing well. True, it took a while to learn how best to help and support their bipolar family member, and time, too, to learn that caregivers also have needs that must be met. Sometimes the stresses and strains were intense, and these families have had their ups and downs. But by educating themselves about bipolar disorder, improving treatment by finding the best possible medication and therapy solutions possible, and communicating as a tightly knit unit, these families have met the challenges, survived intact, and are emotionally healthy.

Here are ways that you can help someone with bipolar disorder:

  • Become educated. The first step is to become educated about bipolar disorder, so you have realistic expectations and coping options.
  • Make this is a family matter. Acknowledge that one member’s depressive disorder affects the entire family. Everyone in your immediate family needs to learn about bipolar disorder, its symptoms and early warning signs, how it is treated, and what the side effects of medications may be. And to whatever degree possible, each member should participate in the caregiving process. Being a caregiver is stressful, and it is important that family members discuss their feelings and opinions. Sometimes it helps if a skilled family therapist facilitates these discussions in group sessions.
  • Be a partner in treatment. Find the right treatment for each individual bipolar sufferer usually means going through a process of trial and error with multiple different medications. Patients also need talk therapy to heal. Finding qualified clinicians (e.g., psychopharmacologist, psychiatrist, psychologist) is essential. As a family caregiver, you can help by finding the best clinicians in your area, scheduling appointments, keeping track of medications and making sure they are taken as prescribed, and being an early warning systems by reporting changes to the clinicians.
  • Meet with the patient’s clinician. Make sure to meet with the clinician treating your family member from time to time. Try to go with your family member and if needed, set up some appointments on your own. Although clinicians have to maintain patient confidentiality, they can listen to you and you can report issues you are having caring for your family member.
  • Be understanding. Let your family member with bipolar disorder continually know that you care. People with bipolar disorder have negative thoughts and are hopeless in a depressive state. They need to be reminded that you and others are concerned about them and that you are working together to help them get well.
  • Take care of yourself. Set healthy boundaries on how much you do so you don’t burn out. Take a vacation from caregiving from time to time. Many caregivers develop depression, so don’t be afraid to seek medical help for yourself. You also may need help processing and dealing with your emotions.
  • Find social support. Dealing with bipolar disorder can be lonely and isolating. You’ve watched the healthy person you once knew deteriorate and suffer. Your friends don’t understand bipolar disorder, and it is difficult for you to go out. Make sure you find sources of support such as a bipolar support group in your area.
  • Develop a crisis plan. Talk to your family member with bipolar disorder about what you will do if the person becomes manic or suicidal. For example, some people with bipolar disorder and their families decide that it is best for the person with bipolar disorder not to use credit cards. Also, determine what you will do if you need to hospitalize the person. Put your plan in writing.
  • Have hope. Remember that in most cases, bipolar disorder is treatable and can be stabilized. The condition is usually cyclical, so be prepared for it to worsen and/or improve at times. Finding the right treatment can be a drawn out process, but in time, a solution will be found.

Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder is depression alternating with mania (elated or irritable moods and increased energy).

Depression

  • For at least two weeks, five or more of these symptoms:
  • Feeling miserable and sad almost everyday
  • Losing interest or pleasure in most activities
  • Feeling anxious or irritable
  • Having trouble concentrating or remembering
  • Feeling tired
  • Feeling guilty
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Eating too much or too little
  • Have medically unexplained aches and pains
  • Abusing alcohol or drugs
  • Thinking of death or suicide

Mania

  • At least three of these symptoms:
  • Increased energy and decreased need for sleep.
  • Excessive irritability, euphoria, or aggressive behavior.
  • Increased talkativeness or pressured speech.
  • Disconnected and racing thoughts.
  • Impulsive behavior and poor judgment such as spending sprees, erratic driving, or sexual indiscretions.
  • Inflated self-esteem
  • Increased goal-directed activities
  • Distractibility

Signs of Suicide

If someone has been preoccupied with thoughts of death or suicide, call his or her clinician today. If you think the person may be harmful to you or others, call 911 or take the person to your local emergency room.

  • Other warning signs include:
  • Talking about hopelessness and worthlessness
  • Suddenly being happier and calmer during a depressive episode
  • Making unusual visits or calling people one cares about
  • Making arrangements or getting one’s affairs in order
  • Giving things away

If Someone is Manic

During mania, a person may become paranoid, believe ideas that aren’t based in reality, spend a lot of money, or engage in unsafe activities. Remember that these behaviors are part of a manic state and the person is not in a normal state of mind. Try to prevent the person from carrying out these actions by talking to them and calling the clinician. You also need to keep the person and your family safe. Sometimes people in a manic state must be hospitalized. Make sure you discuss the behavior and options with your clinician, if possible before a crisis occurs so you can take appropriate action.

Comments (2)

It’s me.

I’m bipolar and caring for my sister with MDD. I would advise in cases where manic episode can cause dangerous behavior like spending all their money, you might want to get a financial power of attorney so you can, if needed, turn off their ATM card for their protection. I know that sometimes it’s impossible to do the right thing, so as caregiver you have to be ready, this needs to be accomplished when we are calm and rational. We have to trust you.

Myra Symons 33 days ago

Mental health and care

Thank you for the information on caring for someone with mental illness. I never thought I would be caring for my daughter who’s 28yrs old full time. The articles are very helpful. My daughter was recently diagnosed with Schizoaffective disorder. She is in to her 6month of treatment. without having any knowledge on mental illness my entire life has changed. Self educating, family and support groups have impatcted my well-being so I can continue caring for my daughter. Thank you once again.

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