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Игра TT Isle of Man – Ride on the Edge 2 теперь доступна на Nintendo Switch

Игра TT Isle of Man – Ride on the Edge 2 теперь доступна на Nintendo Switch

Мотогонщики по всему миру, гонка продолжается!

В NACON и KT Racing сообщили о выпуске TT Isle of Man – Ride on the Edge 2 на Nintendo Switch! В режиме ТВ или в портативном режиме поиграйте в самую культовую гонку на мотоцикле в официальной игре!

Скачать, купить или онлайн игры, а так же обзор и описание, и играть в игры на PS4, PS5, PlayStation, Сони Плейстейшен, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 5, PS VR, PS Vita, Xbox, Икс Бокс, Xbox One, Xbox Series X, Xb1, Xbox 360, Nintendo, Nintendo Switch, NSW, Wii, 3DS, Wii U, Mobile, Телефон, Смартфон, Смартфон, Телефон, iOS, Android, Google Stadia, ПК, PC, Торрент, Torrent, Steam, Магазин Epic Games, Windows

Blood Bowl 3: Закрытое бета-тестирование запланировано на начало 2021 года

NACON анонсировал новый контроллер для игры Call of Duty

В TT Isle of Man – Ride on the Edge 2, вы едете по дорогам горной трассы Снафелл, где туристический трофей острова Мэн оспаривается уже более века. Курс Isle of Man TT очень отличается от классической трассы. Маршрут полон недостатков и включает в себя быстрые повороты, крутые повороты и длинные прямые, где гонщики могут развивать скорость до 186 миль в час (300 км/ч)! TT Isle of Man – Ride on the Edge 2 точно воссоздает сложный курс этой легендарной гонки, в которой безошибочное ожидание является ключом к победе.

TT Isle of Man – Ride on the Edge 2 поднимает реализм на новые высоты, включая улучшенную физику велосипеда, износ различных деталей, а также включение официальных велосипедов и гонщиков TT. KT Racing тесно сотрудничала с двумя профессиональными гонщиками, чтобы оправдать высокие ожидания игроков: Жюльен Тоньютти (Julien Toniutti), самый быстрый французский гонщик в TT; и Дэйви Тодд (Davey Todd), занявший второе место в мировых рейтингах игр и второй самый быстрый новичок всех времен в реальной гонке.

Чтобы продлить веселье, исследуйте новую область, настоящий рай для байкеров: идеальное место для настройки своего байка и решения различных задач, таких как погони и атаки на время. Кроме того, переработанный режим карьеры предлагает каждому игроку возможность перейти от любителя-гонщика к победителю Senior TT! Выбирайте команды, с которыми вы хотите участвовать в гонках в течение сезона, настраивайте свои велосипеды, планируйте свой календарь и управляйте своей карьерой, чтобы выиграть высшую награду.

TT Isle of Man: Ride on the Edge 2 Review

The Isle of Man TT is perhaps the most outrageously dangerous motorsport event in the world. Held on nearly 38 miles of perilously-skinny public road draped over the Isle of Man, this enduring motorcycle time-trial barely goes a year without killing a competitor – claiming over 150 souls since its inception in 1907. Not to be flippant about the loss of life but, above anything else, KT Racing’s TT Isle of Man: Ride on the Edge 2 aptly illustrates why this event is just so potentially deadly.

Diabolically tricky and boasting a wicked sense of speed, this impressive albeit slightly uneven sequel feels fast and dangerous in a way racing games rarely muster.

The star of the show remains the complete 37.73 mile Snaefell Mountain Course itself, with its tree-lined corridors, ancient city streets, and beachside blasts. Navigating the narrow roads of the course at truly sphincter-shrivelling speeds is an immense and unforgiving challenge, and the amount of crashes I’ve had while on maximum attack has made it abundantly clear why the real TT is infamous for its sadly-extensive list of casualties. In fact, there are times when Ride on the Edge 2 seems to share more in common with something like WipeOut than a contemporary motorsports sim, such is the startling velocity, amplified by the cramped roads. The top-notch sound is an integral part of the sensation of speed, particularly the way wind noise thuds through the speakers as your bike whips past trackside objects.

I’ve never been to the Isle of Man but, based on footage, KT Racing’s version of the course is an admirably authentic facsimile of the real thing. I haven’t spotted any especially major visual differences between the version of the course here and the version that debuted in the original 2018 game but, even if there were any, they’d be fairly hard to absorb at speeds regularly tickling 200 miles per hour. There’s some pop-in now and then, but not enough of it to really detract from the experience.

Ride or Die

Like the first game there’s a smattering of other, fictional tracks available too – scattered across the UK and Ireland. They’re adequate but a bit plain compared to the far more densely-detailed Snaefell course. A modest free roam mode is also included, though it’s basically the fictional courses stitched together. The open roads are peppered with typical open-world racing challenges and are adequate for a quick blat, but Ride on the Edge 2’s handling model is much better suited to full throttle racing as opposed to general exploration.

The handling is definitely an improvement over the original, which felt a little more slippery overall. The heavier bikes in particular now cling to the road far more realistically and, while still quite nimble, their bulk is communicated well via their far longer braking distances. Smaller bikes have obviously benefited from the handling tweaks too but I don’t find them as fun to ride as they’re considerably twitchier. There are several layers of assists to lean on should the punishing pro handling prove an insurmountable challenge but know that, even on the simplest settings, Ride on the Edge 2 requires rapid reflexes and an extremely deft touch. A dose of gravel rash is the only reward for cack-handed cornering, and a lapse in concentration at 200 miles per hour will send you spearing into a stone wall like a sidewinder missile.

The chase view leaves something to be desired, unfortunately, sometimes making it appear like the bike is swinging beneath the rider’s head like a pendulum. The bigger problem is that the low-speed handling is still a bit shonky, making acute hairpins and extremely narrow low-speed sections of track unnecessarily troublesome (Snaefell’s Governor’s Bridge hairpin and the subsequent skinny section, right at the end of a lap, is a particularly notorious offender). Tiny bumps also have a regular tendency to high side riders in the blink of an eye. Such accidents are probably partly realistic at these immense speeds, but the kind of track knowledge required to remember all the individual pieces of otherwise undetectable tarmac that will probably buck riders from their bikes in this game is out of my reach. As you’d expect, Ride on the Edge 2 features a dynamic racing line – which does place braking warnings on some dangerous jumps – but it’s a bit frustrating to be thrown off when the racing line is otherwise giving you the all-clear.

Death Wobble

Career mode has been fleshed out since the original but it’s mostly vanilla. There does seem to be a bit more structure to the path to the TT, which has several ways in which you can earn a place. The learning curve is steep, however, and conquering the AI can be a real arm wrestle – particularly when there are commonly one or two frontrunners seemingly capable of supernatural speed at times.

Upgrades need to be applied to your bikes, and you’ll definitely need to secure them to be competitive. There’s also a perk system that can give you a slight edge, which functions like the mod cards in Forza Motorsport 7. These perks feel a bit weird in Ride on the Edge 2, however, as arbitrary buffs to your ballast or brakes and such seem pretty at odds with the game’s pursuit of realism elsewhere. On the one hand it’s kind of handy being able to play a perk that slows the AI down a fraction for an event but, on the other, it also feels a bit like cheating.

Verdict

A blisteringly quick and dangerous-feeling racing game, TT Isle of Man: Ride on the Edge 2 is a plain package and doesn’t quite nail the balance between its serious tone and arcade-style flourishes, but it packs some top-notch two-wheeled racing. If you have the reflexes, that is.

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“TT Isle of Man: Ride on the Edge 2” reviewed

Review

The Isle of Man Tourist Trophy, one of the world’s most spectacular – and deadliest – motorsport events, should have taken place earlier this month.

With no real TT action for fans to enjoy, developers Kylotonn can at least offer PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch and PC gamers an opportunity to take on the legendary road race challenge virtually with TT Isle of Man 2: Ride on the Edge. Is it worth a look – even for those unfamiliar with the daunting course, almost three times longer than the infamous Nurburgring Nordschleife?

One of the best ways to describe TTIoM2 is as the most uncomfortable racing game you’ll ever play. Not just for its deeply punishing and challenging difficulty, but because with every inevitable mistake you’ll make, it’s hard not to flinch at the thought of what the real-life consequences would be.

TTIoM2 allows you to experience every adrenaline-fuelled corner, every heart-stopping bump of the fabled Snaefell Mountain Course in its entirety. The full 60km circuit is here at your disposal, from the downhill plunge to Bray Hill, to the tight right hander of Parliament Square and the Mountain Road as it winds through the stunning rolling hills.

The daunting track is the star of the game The fact that Kylotonn have successfully recreated the largest road course still in use today in such fidelity is an achievement in itself. TT enthusiasts will love to see the circuit’s famous landmarks blur past, while Isle of Man rookies will struggle to believe that racing actually does take place on a circuit with as many raw hazards as this.

Whether racing against AI riders over up to six laps – the length of the prestigious Senior TT – or just alone against the clock in Time Trial, the circuit itself is the centrepiece of TTIoM2. Taking your pick from Supersport class bikes, more powerful Suberbikes or a handful of classic rides, you can take on the full circuit or choose to concentrate on one of 15 or so subsections of the course that developers have handily provided.

Handling-wise, TTIoM2 may not be a full-on simulation, but if you’re new to motorcycle racing or even just motorcycle games, there is zero margin for error offered in the game. Even with all riding assists on and the dynamic racing line to guide you – and absolute must if you aren’t already deeply familiar with the layout – you’ll find yourself falling off or crashing if you touch a kerb, lean too far in corners or even crest a hill using the wrong line.

You’ve got a 60km track to master – and no ‘rewind’ mode That may make the game sound like anything but a fun time. But thanks to its decent handling model, you’ll rarely feel a mistake is anything other than your fault. And with no rewind feature in this game, you’ll have to learn to err on the side of caution at all times.

The game is brutally difficult because this form of racing is brutally difficult. It’s one thing to misjudge your braking point for Ballaugh Bridge, crash into The Raven pub and lose ten seconds respawning in the game. It’s an entirely sobering thought to remember that a similar accident in 2014 resulted in veteran rider Bob Price losing his life.

When you start to learn the labyrinth of twists and turns and begin committing more and more, however, you really do get to feel just a small piece of what must keep these brave souls returning to the island year after year. It feels like the satisfaction of nailing a stage in DIRT Rally combined with the joy of Milestone’s MotoGP series.

TT enthusiasts will appreciate the real-world bikes and riders to race as, from legends like John McGuinness to young upstarts like Davey Todd. It’s good to see the sport of motorcycle road racing being treated with the respect it deserves in a game of this calibre.

But there is more going on here than just one course. TTIoM2 features a decent-sized career mode that allows you to embark on a road racing career as your own avatar. Starting off by signing a contract to race a Supersport bike, you fight to earn the signatures of recommendation in the Irish Championship required to be able to compete in the Senior TT itself.

There are 17 additional, fictional, road circuits here, set in the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland and Great Britain. Races can be time trials against the clock with opponents setting off at staggered times like the TT itself, or traditional mass start races.

Some renderings leave a bit to be desired The career mode does a commendable job of representing the raw thrills of road racing, but it has flaws. There’s no practice or qualifying for races, meaning you’re simply thrown in blind onto a challenging circuit with no way of knowing how to prepare for corners without using the racing line assist or having prior knowledge of the course.

The fact that all the tracks in TTIoM2 are road courses as opposed to permanent race tracks is certainly a novelty, but it means these extra circuits are often no more forgiving than the Isle of Man itself.

Do well and you can earn the ability to buy upgrades for your bike, move teams and categories until you’re eventually taking on all six laps of the Senior TT itself – what must be one of the greatest single-player challenges in the long history of racing games.

Customisation options are somewhat thin With minimal rider and bike customisation and small idiosyncrasies like the lack of practice time, it’s not the greatest career mode available. However, there’s enough here to feel like you’ve got your money’s worth, even if you spend the majority of the time with the game trying to master the Isle of Man course.

Graphically, TTIoM2’s image quality can’t hold up against the likes of Gran Turismo Sport, Assetto Corsa Competizione or the many other racing games available on console.

The lighting and general colour palette of the game does a great job of reflecting how beautiful the Isle of Man is and you’re treated to some quite dramatic views of the surrounding countryside as you blast down the straights and under the canopy of trees shading the track. But, due to the technical realities of rendering a circuit of this unmatched scale on current-gen hardware, you’ll often notice objects popping in in the distance and there’s an overall lack of sharpness to the game when compared to its peers.

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>> Find out more and sign up

Perhaps the biggest challenge for consoles is that the game runs at 30fps with some occasional dips during some of the busier parts of the circuit. It’s not enough to ruin the experience by any means, but it makes you long to see how much better performance could be on the upcoming next generation of consoles.

It’s tempting to say that only TT fans will get the most out of TTIoM2, but that cliche doesn’t feel entirely true in this case.

Yes, motorcycle enthusiasts will certainly appreciate the chance to tackle the most legendary course in their sport from the comfort of their own home, but if you are only lightly familiar with the mystique surrounding the TT, then TTIoM2 is a fantastic way to be introduced properly to the most remarkable race in the world.

Expect to have your ego bruised often. Expect a truly unique racing experience. And expect to develop an even greater appreciation for those few who risk it all to challenge motorcycle racing’s ultimate test.

RaceFans rating

TT Isle of Man: Ride on the Edge 2

Author: Kylotonn
Publisher: Bigben
Published: 2020
Price: £39.99-£49.99

RaceFans earns a commission on products sold via the links to our affiliate partners above, however you are not charged any extra. See here for more information.

Going Forward

Although I have my grievances with the career mode and I wished the game would be more accessible, I was rather pleasantly surprised by the game. Isle of Man 2 looks and sounds great. The environments you race through feel authentic and look realistic. Aside from the Isle of Man course, the developers added a bunch of fictional circuits. And in all honesty, you wouldn’t say these aren’t real life locations. In the audio department, I can only say that the soundtrack was unremarkable, but the bikes sound like the monsters that they are. I also loved the way the sound dampened and the wind intensified at high speed.

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You can’t deny that Isle of Man 2 really gives you the feeling of riding a high-powered motorcycle and I don’t think any other motorcycle games comes this close to simulating that feeling. Now, even though I’ve read that they improved the physics compared to the first game, there still are some hiccups along the way. Even to the point that my bike got sent ridiculously flying through the air. And as there aren’t that many circuits and they mostly have the same rural and idyllic scenery, there’s a lack in diversity in the tracks you’ll be racing on. Regardless, the game feels like a complete package that doesn’t just rely on the competition it’s named after. Much like Kylotonn’s WRC series, Isle of Man shows a lot of promise. There’s still a few problems to iron out, but they’re certainly on the right track.

Reviewed on XBox One.
Download code provided by the publisher.

ПОДРОБНОЕ ОПИСАНИЕ

Примите участие в самой опасной гонке на свете. Покажите, на что вы способны, на извилистой трассе длиной 60,7 км. 18 мотоциклов, лучшие гонщики, 3 категории, 18 трасс и открытый мир.

Купленный вами активационный ключ игры предназначен для сервиса цифровой дистрибуции Steam. Для того чтобы активировать вашу игру вам необходимо выполнить несколько простых шагов:

  1. Запустите клиент сервиса Steam и авторизируйтесь в нём с помощью своего Steam аккаунта.*
  2. В вернем меню выберите опцию «Игры» — «Активировать через Steam»
  3. В появившемся поле введите ваш активационный ключ и далее следуйте инструкциям на экране.

*Если у вас не установлен Steam клиент и вы не зарегистрированы в этом сервисе, то вам необходимо

DLC к игре

О NACON

NACON – это компания группы BIGBEN, основанная в 2019 году для оптимизации своего ноу-хау за счет сильного взаимодействия на рынке видеоигр. Объединяя свои 8 студий разработки, издание видеоигр АА, проектирование и распространение игровых устройств премиум-класса, NACON фокусируется на 20-летнем опыте обслуживания игроков. Это новое объединенное бизнес-подразделение укрепляет позиции NACON на рынке, позволяет ему внедрять инновации, создавая новые уникальные конкурентные преимущества и достигать своих амбиций стать одним из ведущих мировых игроков в играх.

TT Isle of Man: Ride on the Edge 2 Review

The Isle of Man TT is perhaps the most outrageously dangerous motorsport event in the world. Held on nearly 38 miles of perilously-skinny public road draped over the Isle of Man, this enduring motorcycle time-trial barely goes a year without killing a competitor – claiming over 150 souls since its inception in 1907. Not to be flippant about the loss of life but, above anything else, KT Racing’s TT Isle of Man: Ride on the Edge 2 aptly illustrates why this event is just so potentially deadly.

Diabolically tricky and boasting a wicked sense of speed, this impressive albeit slightly uneven sequel feels fast and dangerous in a way racing games rarely muster.

The star of the show remains the complete 37.73 mile Snaefell Mountain Course itself, with its tree-lined corridors, ancient city streets, and beachside blasts. Navigating the narrow roads of the course at truly sphincter-shrivelling speeds is an immense and unforgiving challenge, and the amount of crashes I’ve had while on maximum attack has made it abundantly clear why the real TT is infamous for its sadly-extensive list of casualties. In fact, there are times when Ride on the Edge 2 seems to share more in common with something like WipeOut than a contemporary motorsports sim, such is the startling velocity, amplified by the cramped roads. The top-notch sound is an integral part of the sensation of speed, particularly the way wind noise thuds through the speakers as your bike whips past trackside objects.

I’ve never been to the Isle of Man but, based on footage, KT Racing’s version of the course is an admirably authentic facsimile of the real thing. I haven’t spotted any especially major visual differences between the version of the course here and the version that debuted in the original 2018 game but, even if there were any, they’d be fairly hard to absorb at speeds regularly tickling 200 miles per hour. There’s some pop-in now and then, but not enough of it to really detract from the experience.

Ride or Die

Like the first game there’s a smattering of other, fictional tracks available too – scattered across the UK and Ireland. They’re adequate but a bit plain compared to the far more densely-detailed Snaefell course. A modest free roam mode is also included, though it’s basically the fictional courses stitched together. The open roads are peppered with typical open-world racing challenges and are adequate for a quick blat, but Ride on the Edge 2’s handling model is much better suited to full throttle racing as opposed to general exploration.

The handling is definitely an improvement over the original, which felt a little more slippery overall. The heavier bikes in particular now cling to the road far more realistically and, while still quite nimble, their bulk is communicated well via their far longer braking distances. Smaller bikes have obviously benefited from the handling tweaks too but I don’t find them as fun to ride as they’re considerably twitchier. There are several layers of assists to lean on should the punishing pro handling prove an insurmountable challenge but know that, even on the simplest settings, Ride on the Edge 2 requires rapid reflexes and an extremely deft touch. A dose of gravel rash is the only reward for cack-handed cornering, and a lapse in concentration at 200 miles per hour will send you spearing into a stone wall like a sidewinder missile.

The chase view leaves something to be desired, unfortunately, sometimes making it appear like the bike is swinging beneath the rider’s head like a pendulum. The bigger problem is that the low-speed handling is still a bit shonky, making acute hairpins and extremely narrow low-speed sections of track unnecessarily troublesome (Snaefell’s Governor’s Bridge hairpin and the subsequent skinny section, right at the end of a lap, is a particularly notorious offender). Tiny bumps also have a regular tendency to high side riders in the blink of an eye. Such accidents are probably partly realistic at these immense speeds, but the kind of track knowledge required to remember all the individual pieces of otherwise undetectable tarmac that will probably buck riders from their bikes in this game is out of my reach. As you’d expect, Ride on the Edge 2 features a dynamic racing line – which does place braking warnings on some dangerous jumps – but it’s a bit frustrating to be thrown off when the racing line is otherwise giving you the all-clear.

Death Wobble

Career mode has been fleshed out since the original but it’s mostly vanilla. There does seem to be a bit more structure to the path to the TT, which has several ways in which you can earn a place. The learning curve is steep, however, and conquering the AI can be a real arm wrestle – particularly when there are commonly one or two frontrunners seemingly capable of supernatural speed at times.

Upgrades need to be applied to your bikes, and you’ll definitely need to secure them to be competitive. There’s also a perk system that can give you a slight edge, which functions like the mod cards in Forza Motorsport 7. These perks feel a bit weird in Ride on the Edge 2, however, as arbitrary buffs to your ballast or brakes and such seem pretty at odds with the game’s pursuit of realism elsewhere. On the one hand it’s kind of handy being able to play a perk that slows the AI down a fraction for an event but, on the other, it also feels a bit like cheating.

Verdict

A blisteringly quick and dangerous-feeling racing game, TT Isle of Man: Ride on the Edge 2 is a plain package and doesn’t quite nail the balance between its serious tone and arcade-style flourishes, but it packs some top-notch two-wheeled racing. If you have the reflexes, that is.

“TT Isle of Man: Ride on the Edge 2” reviewed

Review

The Isle of Man Tourist Trophy, one of the world’s most spectacular – and deadliest – motorsport events, should have taken place earlier this month.

With no real TT action for fans to enjoy, developers Kylotonn can at least offer PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch and PC gamers an opportunity to take on the legendary road race challenge virtually with TT Isle of Man 2: Ride on the Edge. Is it worth a look – even for those unfamiliar with the daunting course, almost three times longer than the infamous Nurburgring Nordschleife?

One of the best ways to describe TTIoM2 is as the most uncomfortable racing game you’ll ever play. Not just for its deeply punishing and challenging difficulty, but because with every inevitable mistake you’ll make, it’s hard not to flinch at the thought of what the real-life consequences would be.

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TTIoM2 allows you to experience every adrenaline-fuelled corner, every heart-stopping bump of the fabled Snaefell Mountain Course in its entirety. The full 60km circuit is here at your disposal, from the downhill plunge to Bray Hill, to the tight right hander of Parliament Square and the Mountain Road as it winds through the stunning rolling hills.

The daunting track is the star of the game The fact that Kylotonn have successfully recreated the largest road course still in use today in such fidelity is an achievement in itself. TT enthusiasts will love to see the circuit’s famous landmarks blur past, while Isle of Man rookies will struggle to believe that racing actually does take place on a circuit with as many raw hazards as this.

Whether racing against AI riders over up to six laps – the length of the prestigious Senior TT – or just alone against the clock in Time Trial, the circuit itself is the centrepiece of TTIoM2. Taking your pick from Supersport class bikes, more powerful Suberbikes or a handful of classic rides, you can take on the full circuit or choose to concentrate on one of 15 or so subsections of the course that developers have handily provided.

Handling-wise, TTIoM2 may not be a full-on simulation, but if you’re new to motorcycle racing or even just motorcycle games, there is zero margin for error offered in the game. Even with all riding assists on and the dynamic racing line to guide you – and absolute must if you aren’t already deeply familiar with the layout – you’ll find yourself falling off or crashing if you touch a kerb, lean too far in corners or even crest a hill using the wrong line.

You’ve got a 60km track to master – and no ‘rewind’ mode That may make the game sound like anything but a fun time. But thanks to its decent handling model, you’ll rarely feel a mistake is anything other than your fault. And with no rewind feature in this game, you’ll have to learn to err on the side of caution at all times.

The game is brutally difficult because this form of racing is brutally difficult. It’s one thing to misjudge your braking point for Ballaugh Bridge, crash into The Raven pub and lose ten seconds respawning in the game. It’s an entirely sobering thought to remember that a similar accident in 2014 resulted in veteran rider Bob Price losing his life.

When you start to learn the labyrinth of twists and turns and begin committing more and more, however, you really do get to feel just a small piece of what must keep these brave souls returning to the island year after year. It feels like the satisfaction of nailing a stage in DIRT Rally combined with the joy of Milestone’s MotoGP series.

TT enthusiasts will appreciate the real-world bikes and riders to race as, from legends like John McGuinness to young upstarts like Davey Todd. It’s good to see the sport of motorcycle road racing being treated with the respect it deserves in a game of this calibre.

But there is more going on here than just one course. TTIoM2 features a decent-sized career mode that allows you to embark on a road racing career as your own avatar. Starting off by signing a contract to race a Supersport bike, you fight to earn the signatures of recommendation in the Irish Championship required to be able to compete in the Senior TT itself.

There are 17 additional, fictional, road circuits here, set in the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland and Great Britain. Races can be time trials against the clock with opponents setting off at staggered times like the TT itself, or traditional mass start races.

Some renderings leave a bit to be desired The career mode does a commendable job of representing the raw thrills of road racing, but it has flaws. There’s no practice or qualifying for races, meaning you’re simply thrown in blind onto a challenging circuit with no way of knowing how to prepare for corners without using the racing line assist or having prior knowledge of the course.

The fact that all the tracks in TTIoM2 are road courses as opposed to permanent race tracks is certainly a novelty, but it means these extra circuits are often no more forgiving than the Isle of Man itself.

Do well and you can earn the ability to buy upgrades for your bike, move teams and categories until you’re eventually taking on all six laps of the Senior TT itself – what must be one of the greatest single-player challenges in the long history of racing games.

Customisation options are somewhat thin With minimal rider and bike customisation and small idiosyncrasies like the lack of practice time, it’s not the greatest career mode available. However, there’s enough here to feel like you’ve got your money’s worth, even if you spend the majority of the time with the game trying to master the Isle of Man course.

Graphically, TTIoM2’s image quality can’t hold up against the likes of Gran Turismo Sport, Assetto Corsa Competizione or the many other racing games available on console.

The lighting and general colour palette of the game does a great job of reflecting how beautiful the Isle of Man is and you’re treated to some quite dramatic views of the surrounding countryside as you blast down the straights and under the canopy of trees shading the track. But, due to the technical realities of rendering a circuit of this unmatched scale on current-gen hardware, you’ll often notice objects popping in in the distance and there’s an overall lack of sharpness to the game when compared to its peers.

Go ad-free for just £1 per month

>> Find out more and sign up

Perhaps the biggest challenge for consoles is that the game runs at 30fps with some occasional dips during some of the busier parts of the circuit. It’s not enough to ruin the experience by any means, but it makes you long to see how much better performance could be on the upcoming next generation of consoles.

It’s tempting to say that only TT fans will get the most out of TTIoM2, but that cliche doesn’t feel entirely true in this case.

Yes, motorcycle enthusiasts will certainly appreciate the chance to tackle the most legendary course in their sport from the comfort of their own home, but if you are only lightly familiar with the mystique surrounding the TT, then TTIoM2 is a fantastic way to be introduced properly to the most remarkable race in the world.

Expect to have your ego bruised often. Expect a truly unique racing experience. And expect to develop an even greater appreciation for those few who risk it all to challenge motorcycle racing’s ultimate test.

RaceFans rating

TT Isle of Man: Ride on the Edge 2

Author: Kylotonn
Publisher: Bigben
Published: 2020
Price: £39.99-£49.99

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Going Forward

Although I have my grievances with the career mode and I wished the game would be more accessible, I was rather pleasantly surprised by the game. Isle of Man 2 looks and sounds great. The environments you race through feel authentic and look realistic. Aside from the Isle of Man course, the developers added a bunch of fictional circuits. And in all honesty, you wouldn’t say these aren’t real life locations. In the audio department, I can only say that the soundtrack was unremarkable, but the bikes sound like the monsters that they are. I also loved the way the sound dampened and the wind intensified at high speed.

You can’t deny that Isle of Man 2 really gives you the feeling of riding a high-powered motorcycle and I don’t think any other motorcycle games comes this close to simulating that feeling. Now, even though I’ve read that they improved the physics compared to the first game, there still are some hiccups along the way. Even to the point that my bike got sent ridiculously flying through the air. And as there aren’t that many circuits and they mostly have the same rural and idyllic scenery, there’s a lack in diversity in the tracks you’ll be racing on. Regardless, the game feels like a complete package that doesn’t just rely on the competition it’s named after. Much like Kylotonn’s WRC series, Isle of Man shows a lot of promise. There’s still a few problems to iron out, but they’re certainly on the right track.

Reviewed on XBox One.
Download code provided by the publisher.

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